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INI Students Secure Quality Summer Positions 


February 21, 2013

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Even while snow flies in the Pittsburgh air, the busy INI career services office is well aware that spring is on its way. Amid resume reviews and interviews, the eyes of first-year students are focused on May, when they will venture out of the classroom and into the workplace for internships and special projects. Although not a requirement, the majority of students from the Class of 2013 (MS23) obtained internship positions last summer. For details on the employers and locations, view the internship statistics for summer of 2012.

Some examples of the large organizations that hired at least one summer intern from the INI are Apple, Bloomberg, Cisco Systems, Google, Microsoft, NetApp, Nvidia, Raytheon, Samsung Telecommunications, Sears Holding Corporation and VMware. Amazon brought on as many as thirteen INI students last summer! Other students, largely with career directions in information security, were recruited for government internships, including one at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The INI typically reports internship statistics that are located heavily in the regions of Pittsburgh and Silicon Valley, where students are taking courses at Carnegie Mellon's campuses. In fact, the CERT Program at Carnegie Mellon's Software Engineering Institute in Pittsburgh has been a regular recruiter of INI students for graduate research assistants. Nonetheless students manage to gain opportunities just about anywhere. Last summer, students reported having internships in locations as far as Shanghai and as interesting as Boston, Austin, Albuquerque and Phoenix.


When it comes to a student selecting the "right" internship, however, the employer's reputation and location are only a small part of the equation. The priority is for students to find positions that will exercise their skills and will fit sensibly along the trajectory toward their career goals. The job-related experiences that students gain between semesters can give them an extra boost next year when they seek jobs and research opportunities after graduation.